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The Hurdles Facing Foundations Have Never Been Higher

Responding to a higher disbursement obligation in a lower return environment

In light of the Government of Canada's decision to increase the disbursement quota for foundations, we believe foundation executives and trustees should look to “Active Credit” to improve the return potential of their fixed income allocation.

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What Should An Allocator Do With Their Core Bond Portfolio?

Faced with a challenging return environment, pension and endowment investors are presented with some difficult choices. We believe that a thoughtful unbundling of the fixed income allocation can help investors preserve liquidity needs and generate more income than a traditional core allocation without increasing portfolio risk.

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2021 Sustainability Report

At RPIA, 2021 was an important year for our ESG evolution as we refined our ESG philosophy and began our own ESG journey. Our 2021 Sustainability Report details how we continue to incorporate ESG into our firm operations, investment management philosophy, and our goals for 2022.

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Cover for RPIA 2021 Sustainability Report
 
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Our Solutions

Our Solutions

We serve a broad range of investors through a variety of solutions catering to their unique investment goals. We apply our differentiated active skillset in all our strategies, which vary from low-risk to higher-risk. Although our toolkit and risk/return levels vary across our suite of products, our credit expertise, proprietary technology, and rigorous risk management is applied throughout. We have collaborated closely with institutional investors in developing several of our strategies to ensure that the portfolio mandate aligns with their long-term investment objectives.

RPIA Develops Carbon-Reduced Fixed Income Solution

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Investment Process

Investment Process

RPIA's approach is to apply a highly active, dynamic investment process that enables us to consistently extract value from the global credit market, driven by security selection. Investors do not need to compromise on credit quality or sacrifice liquidity to improve their portfolio returns. Our active approach can be distilled into four steps:

1. The Investment Committee uses their expertise and experience to collaborate and identify a key theme based on prevailing macroeconomic conditions.

2. The Credit Research Team conducts deep-dive research to determine the most compelling issuer, drawing from their knowledge of the sectors each team member covers.

3. We utilize our proprietary technology and expertise to identify the most attractively priced bond within that issuer's capital structure

4. The Portfolio Management Team sizes the position accordingly within the strategy based on factors such as conviction level, existing exposures, and liquidity considerations to name a few.

The entire process is overseen by our independent Risk Management Team and Committee who analyze policy constraints, stress testing, and concentrations across strategies.

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Our Strategies

Our Strategies

RPIA offers a range of investment strategies reflecting our investors' diverse risk and return objectives. Our flagship institutional long-only strategy is RP Broad Corporate Bond, which has evolved into a suite of strategies for specific goals in collaboration with investors. In addition to our institutional-focused mandates, we also offer absolute return-focused strategies.

1. Long-Only Strategies

  • RP Broad Corporate Bond
  • RP Broad Corporate Bond (BBB, Carbon-Reduced)

2. Alternative Credit & Fixed Income

  • RP Debt Opportunities
  • RP Select Opportunities
  • RP Fixed Income Plus

3. Mutual Funds

  • RP Strategic Income Plus Fund
  • RP Alternative Global Bond Fund
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ESG

ESG

RPIA considers Environmental, Social, and Governance ("ESG") factors when making investment decisions for all the strategies we manage. When we include these factors alongside traditional financial metrics, we can think more broadly about risk and make more prudent investment decisions. In other words, it is in the best interests of our investors to integrate ESG into our process. Through our in-depth credit research, we are in regular communication with the management teams of the issuers in which we invest. We have also partnered with an institutional investor to design a strategy that targets specific ESG outcomes and, in this case, an Environmental outcome. We have been a signatory to UN PRI since 2018 and have several other industry memberships ( learn more).

Download Our ESG Policy Read Our 2021 Sustainability Report

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Explore Our Funds

RP Broad Corporate Bond

This actively managed credit strategy's primary objective is to outperform the FTSE Canada All Corporate Bond Index net of fees in a risk-controlled manner. The strategy aims to add value through superior credit selection across global credit markets and avoid uncompensated interest rate risk by remaining duration-neutral versus the benchmark.

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RP Broad Corporate Bond (BBB, Carbon Reduced)

An actively managed credit strategy whose primary objective is to outperform the FTSE Canada Corporate BBB Index net of fees by 100 bps on an annualized basis. The strategy extends on our longstanding Broad Corporate Bond investment process by including explicit ESG targets. Investments in tobacco and munitions are prohibited, and the strategy aims to keep the carbon intensity at least 30% lower than the index.

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Market Commentary

Withstanding Inflationary Pressures and a Slowing Economy

June, 2022

The rate of volatility in the first five months of 2022, coupled with the persistently uncertain macro  backdrop, has driven us to take a conservative approach in our sector positioning year-to-date. Two broad concerns are leading us to believe that a cautious stance on credit is needed right now:

1. An uncertain inflation picture highlighted by:

Widespread raw material and commodity inflation due to surging demand intersecting with a stumbling supply chain, exacerbated by COVID-driven lockdowns.

Significant labour cost inflation is making it difficult for companies to hire enough workers to meet the surging demand for goods and services in a reopening economy.

2. An uncertain economic growth picture highlighted by:

Growth that was pulled forward during COVID and the large corporate capital expenditures that took place over the last two years could prove to be overzealous and cause downside risk to long-term earnings projections.

A weakening consumer, despite adding nearly $2 trillion of excess capital to their balance sheets over the last couple of years, is beginning to see inflation eat into their wallets and affect their confidence to spend discretionary money.

With these risks in mind, we are finding value in more resilient businesses, which allow us to  capture higher yields available in today’s market without necessarily adding credit risk that we  believe is uncompensated at this point in the cycle.

Example 1: Finding Strength in Diversified Banks

US banks have a strong fundamental profile entering this downturn compared to previous cycles. Bank balance sheets are generally healthy today, with high-quality loan portfolios, low loan loss rates and delinquencies, and high reserves, capital, and liquidity levels. Banks have also diversified their businesses, either organically or through M&A, and have grown their fee-generating business segments to provide a more stable revenue stream and help manage profitability through cycles.

US banks also look attractive from a valuation perspective as front-loaded supply year-to-date has driven underperformance versus the broad investment-grade market. With the expectation of issuance slowing in the second half of the year, technical factors should support relative valuations.

 

Graph showing how US banks also look attractive from a valuation perspective as front-loaded supply year-to-date  has driven underperformance versus the broad investment-grade market

Source: ICE BofAML. Data as of Apr. 30th, 2022.

While we see several risks across the macro environment, including supply chain issues, elevated inflation, and growing geopolitical risks, operating conditions for banks remain favourable with rising interest rates and steady loan growth. As a result, we expect their profitability to remain strong in the near term. We particularly favour US banks focused on the domestic market with stable and diversified revenue streams and maintain substantial capital buffers above regulatory requirements.

US Diversified Banks vs. Monoline Lenders

One example of a bank that fits this profile is Morgan Stanley (“MS”). The bank has taken strategic steps to shift its business towards wealth and investment management over the past several years. Recent acquisitions of E*TRADE and Eaton Vance are highly complementary to MS’s existing businesses and have helped diversify its business mix towards lower-risk, recurring revenue streams to deliver more stable profitability. The on-boarding of E*TRADE has also grown MS’s deposit base significantly and lowered its reliance on the higher cost and more market-sensitive wholesale funding. Moreover, MS has maintained very healthy capital levels, with sizable buffers over regulatory requirements and solid performance in annual Federal Reserve stress tests. We believe these factors leave the bank well-positioned for the current environment.

Pie charts - Morgan Stanley Revenue Mix and World Acceptance Revenue Mix

Source: Morgan Stanley Q1 2022 company financials, World Acceptance Q1 2022 company financials.

On the other hand, we take a less constructive view on monoline lenders, such as World Acceptance. Generally, these lenders are more exposed to borrowers with lower household incomes and lower credit scores. These names tend to perform well in periods of economic expansion, but we expect to continue seeing higher prices across food, energy, and housing, which account for well over half of lower-income household budgets. Consequently, the borrower base for these companies is likely to experience the greatest adverse impact from an economic slowdown, and they are likely to feel that impact earlier than households with better balance sheets. 

Given where we are in this process, we want to avoid lenders who are overwhelmingly exposed to the weakest borrowers. Although markets have already responded to expected weakness and pushed security prices down, the unprecedented withdrawal of central bank support makes it difficult to call a bottom as there could be more room for prices to fall. With that in mind, we remain focused on finding relative value opportunities within sectors, favouring the diversified lenders mentioned above and avoiding the monoline lenders at this stage of the economic cycle.

Example 2: Consumer Staples Showing Resilient Demand and Pricing Power while Discretionary Spending Outlook is Shaky

We like consumer staples because of their non-cyclical nature, particularly when demand for products is mostly uncorrelated to the state of the economy. These businesses exhibit weaker price elasticity, meaning consumer demand for their products is not as impacted by rising prices. As a result of the current inflationary environment and concerns about an impending recession, the ability to pass-through costs and maintain demand is becoming increasingly important.

This has been evident with this past quarter’s earnings results, where sectors we like and have exposure to across our funds, such as food, beverage, household goods, and alcohol companies, were largely able to increase prices to match the significant cost inflation while maintaining demand. Molson Coors, for example, delivered record quarterly revenue growth this past quarter while also demonstrating margin improvement.

We expect to continue to be impacted by inflationary pressures in areas including materials and transportation costs, and expect those pressures to increase for the balance of the year. However, we intend to judiciously pull our multiple levers to help mitigate the impact. - Molson Coors’ CFO, Tracey Joubert, Q1 2022 earnings call

We expect consumer staples to continue to outperform and have positioned accordingly. We have tried to specifically identify consumer staples that we believe can continue to pass through cost increases, are continuing to benefit from the economy reopening post-COVID and are improving credit fundamentals.

 

Bar Chart Showing Sector Performance Correlations with Core Consumer Price Index (CPI)

 

Source: Wells Fargo Investment Institute, Strategas. Data as of May 18th, 2021. Correlations between year-over-year performance of sectors and core consumer price inflation. Performance based on the S&P 500 GICS sector classifications. 

Conversely, we do not like consumer discretionary-focused businesses as consumers facing price increases across the board are forced to cut back their expenses somewhere, causing them to pull back on discretionary purchases.

…the rate of inflation in food pulled more dollars away from [general merchandise] than we expected, as customers needed to pay for the inflation in food. – Walmart’s CEO, Doug McMillon, Q1 2022 earnings call

We are positioned cautiously on consumer discretionary, specifically taking a negative position on issuers we expect to experience challenged operating performance and see the risk for secondary impacts of increased M&A or shareholder returns to lead to material credit deterioration. 

PC Hardware

Cost inflation and a pull-forward of demand for items such as PCs, laptops, and related accessories over the last couple of years should lead to slowing demand and lower margins. As a result, we are short a large computer hardware firm, which generates more than half of its revenues from personal systems (notebooks, desktops, workstations). 

The company has shifted its capital allocation policy toward being more shareholder-friendly by returning capital to shareholders through dividends and significant share repurchases, which is a negative development for holders of its bonds.

Re-opening Theme is the Exception

However, we remain constructive on the reopening trade and believe this current environment is unique, especially for experiential discretionary spending. While consumers are broadly looking to cut their spending, given their pandemic experience, we continue to see strong demand from consumers who seek to get out of their house and enjoy experiences with friends and family. 

For example, on their Q1 2022 earnings call, Target Corp. specifically highlighted the spend shift from TVs to luggage, which we believe supports continued recovery and strength in travel, including airlines, cruises, and lodging.

Sector Research and Selection Plays an Important Role in Capturing Upside

We feel that our team-based approach allows us to differentiate and apply our sector views intelligently to add value to our investment process. Our research team conducts a deep-dive analysis on sectors and credits and works closely with our execution team to identify tactical, opportunistic investment ideas.

We feel well-positioned across our funds for the current investment environment and the unique challenges each sector faces. But we are also mindful that significant downward moves in the equity market could lead many companies to pursue debt-funded share buybacks to support their stock prices and put further pressure on their bonds.
 

 

 

 

 

 

Important Information

The information herein is presented by RP Investment Advisors LP (“RPIA”) and is for informational purposes only. It does not provide financial, legal, accounting, tax, investment, or other advice and should not be acted or relied upon in that regard without seeking the appropriate professional advice. The information is drawn from sources believed to be reliable, but the accuracy or completeness of the information is not guaranteed, nor in providing it does RPIA as¬sume any responsibility or liability whatsoever. The information provided may be subject to change and RPIA does not undertake any obligation to communicate revisions or updates to the information presented. Unless otherwise stated, the source for all information is RPIA. The information presented does not form the basis of any offer or solicitation for the purchase or sale of securities. Products and services of RPIA are only available in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered and to investors who qualify under applicable regulation. RPIA managed strategies and funds carry the risk of financial loss. Performance is not guaranteed and past performance may not be repeated. “Forward-Looking” statements are based on assumptions made by RPIA regarding its opinion and investment strategies in certain market conditions and are subject to a number of mitigating factors. Economic and market conditions may change, which may materially impact actual future events and as a result RPIA’s views, the success of RPIA’s intended strategies as well as its actual course of conduct.

 

ESG Articles

Withstanding Inflationary Pressures and a Slowing Economy

June, 2022

The rate of volatility in the first five months of 2022, coupled with the persistently uncertain macro  backdrop, has driven us to take a conservative approach in our sector positioning year-to-date. Two broad concerns are leading us to believe that a cautious stance on credit is needed right now:

1. An uncertain inflation picture highlighted by:

Widespread raw material and commodity inflation due to surging demand intersecting with a stumbling supply chain, exacerbated by COVID-driven lockdowns.

Significant labour cost inflation is making it difficult for companies to hire enough workers to meet the surging demand for goods and services in a reopening economy.

2. An uncertain economic growth picture highlighted by:

Growth that was pulled forward during COVID and the large corporate capital expenditures that took place over the last two years could prove to be overzealous and cause downside risk to long-term earnings projections.

A weakening consumer, despite adding nearly $2 trillion of excess capital to their balance sheets over the last couple of years, is beginning to see inflation eat into their wallets and affect their confidence to spend discretionary money.

With these risks in mind, we are finding value in more resilient businesses, which allow us to  capture higher yields available in today’s market without necessarily adding credit risk that we  believe is uncompensated at this point in the cycle.

Example 1: Finding Strength in Diversified Banks

US banks have a strong fundamental profile entering this downturn compared to previous cycles. Bank balance sheets are generally healthy today, with high-quality loan portfolios, low loan loss rates and delinquencies, and high reserves, capital, and liquidity levels. Banks have also diversified their businesses, either organically or through M&A, and have grown their fee-generating business segments to provide a more stable revenue stream and help manage profitability through cycles.

US banks also look attractive from a valuation perspective as front-loaded supply year-to-date has driven underperformance versus the broad investment-grade market. With the expectation of issuance slowing in the second half of the year, technical factors should support relative valuations.

 

Graph showing how US banks also look attractive from a valuation perspective as front-loaded supply year-to-date  has driven underperformance versus the broad investment-grade market

Source: ICE BofAML. Data as of Apr. 30th, 2022.

While we see several risks across the macro environment, including supply chain issues, elevated inflation, and growing geopolitical risks, operating conditions for banks remain favourable with rising interest rates and steady loan growth. As a result, we expect their profitability to remain strong in the near term. We particularly favour US banks focused on the domestic market with stable and diversified revenue streams and maintain substantial capital buffers above regulatory requirements.

US Diversified Banks vs. Monoline Lenders

One example of a bank that fits this profile is Morgan Stanley (“MS”). The bank has taken strategic steps to shift its business towards wealth and investment management over the past several years. Recent acquisitions of E*TRADE and Eaton Vance are highly complementary to MS’s existing businesses and have helped diversify its business mix towards lower-risk, recurring revenue streams to deliver more stable profitability. The on-boarding of E*TRADE has also grown MS’s deposit base significantly and lowered its reliance on the higher cost and more market-sensitive wholesale funding. Moreover, MS has maintained very healthy capital levels, with sizable buffers over regulatory requirements and solid performance in annual Federal Reserve stress tests. We believe these factors leave the bank well-positioned for the current environment.

Pie charts - Morgan Stanley Revenue Mix and World Acceptance Revenue Mix

Source: Morgan Stanley Q1 2022 company financials, World Acceptance Q1 2022 company financials.

On the other hand, we take a less constructive view on monoline lenders, such as World Acceptance. Generally, these lenders are more exposed to borrowers with lower household incomes and lower credit scores. These names tend to perform well in periods of economic expansion, but we expect to continue seeing higher prices across food, energy, and housing, which account for well over half of lower-income household budgets. Consequently, the borrower base for these companies is likely to experience the greatest adverse impact from an economic slowdown, and they are likely to feel that impact earlier than households with better balance sheets. 

Given where we are in this process, we want to avoid lenders who are overwhelmingly exposed to the weakest borrowers. Although markets have already responded to expected weakness and pushed security prices down, the unprecedented withdrawal of central bank support makes it difficult to call a bottom as there could be more room for prices to fall. With that in mind, we remain focused on finding relative value opportunities within sectors, favouring the diversified lenders mentioned above and avoiding the monoline lenders at this stage of the economic cycle.

Example 2: Consumer Staples Showing Resilient Demand and Pricing Power while Discretionary Spending Outlook is Shaky

We like consumer staples because of their non-cyclical nature, particularly when demand for products is mostly uncorrelated to the state of the economy. These businesses exhibit weaker price elasticity, meaning consumer demand for their products is not as impacted by rising prices. As a result of the current inflationary environment and concerns about an impending recession, the ability to pass-through costs and maintain demand is becoming increasingly important.

This has been evident with this past quarter’s earnings results, where sectors we like and have exposure to across our funds, such as food, beverage, household goods, and alcohol companies, were largely able to increase prices to match the significant cost inflation while maintaining demand. Molson Coors, for example, delivered record quarterly revenue growth this past quarter while also demonstrating margin improvement.

We expect to continue to be impacted by inflationary pressures in areas including materials and transportation costs, and expect those pressures to increase for the balance of the year. However, we intend to judiciously pull our multiple levers to help mitigate the impact. - Molson Coors’ CFO, Tracey Joubert, Q1 2022 earnings call

We expect consumer staples to continue to outperform and have positioned accordingly. We have tried to specifically identify consumer staples that we believe can continue to pass through cost increases, are continuing to benefit from the economy reopening post-COVID and are improving credit fundamentals.

 

Bar Chart Showing Sector Performance Correlations with Core Consumer Price Index (CPI)

 

Source: Wells Fargo Investment Institute, Strategas. Data as of May 18th, 2021. Correlations between year-over-year performance of sectors and core consumer price inflation. Performance based on the S&P 500 GICS sector classifications. 

Conversely, we do not like consumer discretionary-focused businesses as consumers facing price increases across the board are forced to cut back their expenses somewhere, causing them to pull back on discretionary purchases.

…the rate of inflation in food pulled more dollars away from [general merchandise] than we expected, as customers needed to pay for the inflation in food. – Walmart’s CEO, Doug McMillon, Q1 2022 earnings call

We are positioned cautiously on consumer discretionary, specifically taking a negative position on issuers we expect to experience challenged operating performance and see the risk for secondary impacts of increased M&A or shareholder returns to lead to material credit deterioration. 

PC Hardware

Cost inflation and a pull-forward of demand for items such as PCs, laptops, and related accessories over the last couple of years should lead to slowing demand and lower margins. As a result, we are short a large computer hardware firm, which generates more than half of its revenues from personal systems (notebooks, desktops, workstations). 

The company has shifted its capital allocation policy toward being more shareholder-friendly by returning capital to shareholders through dividends and significant share repurchases, which is a negative development for holders of its bonds.

Re-opening Theme is the Exception

However, we remain constructive on the reopening trade and believe this current environment is unique, especially for experiential discretionary spending. While consumers are broadly looking to cut their spending, given their pandemic experience, we continue to see strong demand from consumers who seek to get out of their house and enjoy experiences with friends and family. 

For example, on their Q1 2022 earnings call, Target Corp. specifically highlighted the spend shift from TVs to luggage, which we believe supports continued recovery and strength in travel, including airlines, cruises, and lodging.

Sector Research and Selection Plays an Important Role in Capturing Upside

We feel that our team-based approach allows us to differentiate and apply our sector views intelligently to add value to our investment process. Our research team conducts a deep-dive analysis on sectors and credits and works closely with our execution team to identify tactical, opportunistic investment ideas.

We feel well-positioned across our funds for the current investment environment and the unique challenges each sector faces. But we are also mindful that significant downward moves in the equity market could lead many companies to pursue debt-funded share buybacks to support their stock prices and put further pressure on their bonds.
 

 

 

 

 

 

Important Information

The information herein is presented by RP Investment Advisors LP (“RPIA”) and is for informational purposes only. It does not provide financial, legal, accounting, tax, investment, or other advice and should not be acted or relied upon in that regard without seeking the appropriate professional advice. The information is drawn from sources believed to be reliable, but the accuracy or completeness of the information is not guaranteed, nor in providing it does RPIA as¬sume any responsibility or liability whatsoever. The information provided may be subject to change and RPIA does not undertake any obligation to communicate revisions or updates to the information presented. Unless otherwise stated, the source for all information is RPIA. The information presented does not form the basis of any offer or solicitation for the purchase or sale of securities. Products and services of RPIA are only available in jurisdictions where they may be lawfully offered and to investors who qualify under applicable regulation. RPIA managed strategies and funds carry the risk of financial loss. Performance is not guaranteed and past performance may not be repeated. “Forward-Looking” statements are based on assumptions made by RPIA regarding its opinion and investment strategies in certain market conditions and are subject to a number of mitigating factors. Economic and market conditions may change, which may materially impact actual future events and as a result RPIA’s views, the success of RPIA’s intended strategies as well as its actual course of conduct.

 

Relationship Team

 
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Principal, Co-Head of Client Portfolio Management

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Principal, Co-Head of Client Portfolio Management

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Vice President, Client Portfolio Management